Aug 6 2010

Adjust the Security Level in Excel

If you’ve ever used any Excel files that had macros included, you’ve probably come across the security settings in Microsoft Excel. There are multiple levels of security that Excel provides depending on your comfort level of running macros on your computer. Below we’ll look at how to change this setting and what each setting does.

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Changing Security Levels

Changing the security settings are done at a program level, so the changes you make will be across each spreadsheet you open from then on. To change the security settings for your local copy of excel, try the following from the main menu:

  1. Select Tools –> Macro –> Security
  2. Select the level of security you are comfortable with
  3. Select OK
  4. Close and re-open the current document you were working on for the changes to take effect

Available Security Levels

There are many different levels of security listed below as described by Excel (2003):

  • Very High. Only macros installed in trusted locations will be allowed to run. All other signed and unsigned macros are disabled.
  • High. Only signed macros from trusted sources will be allowed to run. Unsigned macros are automatically disabled.
  • Medium. You can choose whether or not to run potentially unsafe macros.
  • Low (not recommended). You are not protected from potentially unsafe macros. Use this setting only if you have virus scanning software installed, or you have checked the safety of all documents you open.

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7 Comments on this post

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  1. Macro Security Settings in Excel 2007 and 2010 Skip to end of metadata | SoftArtisans, Blogged Macro Security Settings in Excel 2007 and 2010 Skip to end of metadata | The Cathedral and the Bizarre wrote:

    [...] If you are using Excel 2003, the macro settings will be different. Excel Hints has a good overview of those settings here: http://excelhints.com/2010/08/06/adjust-the-security-level-in-excel/. [...]

    December 13th, 2011 at 6:24 pm
  1. used tires said:

    I’ve had to do this other day in order for me to use some of the excel applications that my professor sent me, in fact he told us to do this, its just weird that we have to actually do this in Excel, any particular reason why there are security levels for Macros?

    Till then,

    Jean

    September 1st, 2010 at 1:41 am
  2. Online Penny Auctions said:

    Hi,
    Its very useful article but here is one question in my mind please answer me…

    How do I sign macros in Microsoft Excel so that other users can run it at high security level?

    September 1st, 2010 at 11:50 am
  3. Automobile India said:

    “Anyone have any idea why Microsoft did this?” … yes, they assume that the average user is not only a “Dummy” but a complete and utter moron. Check the first 3 letteers in “assume.”

    September 2nd, 2010 at 12:00 am
  4. Generators said:

    I’ve had to accomplish this other day so as for me to utilize a few of the excel applications that my professor sent me, in simple fact he advised us to complete this, its just weird that we must actually do that in Excel, any particular motive why you will find safety levels for Macros?

    September 3rd, 2010 at 2:09 pm
  5. Generators said:

    I’ve had to try and do this other day in order for me to utilize some of the excel applications that my professor sent me, in fact he informed us to try and do this, its just weird that we must really try this in Excel, any unique explanation why you can find security ranges for Macros?

    September 3rd, 2010 at 2:10 pm
  6. Certified Translation said:

    I’ve had to achieve this other day so as for me to make use of a couple of on the excel programs that my professor sent me, in straightforward point he suggested us to complete this, its just weird that we ought to actually do that in Excel, any particular motive why you will discover safety levels for Macros?

    December 19th, 2010 at 11:53 am

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